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NSB seminar/colloquium (2020-2021) - Shared screen with speaker view - Recording 2/2
MAXIMILIANO ZULUAGA-FORERO
01:13:53
Q: All those landmarks are visual?
Paul Katz
01:14:37
Max - yes in these conditions
Akhil Bandi
01:25:02
Q - Is the fluctuation in Ca2+ activity in both ellipsoid body and protocerebral bridge simultaneous or is there a time delay?
Akhil Bandi
01:26:08
Thanks!
Brennan Falcy
01:34:30
Is the phase in reference to the head position of the fly to a given landmark?
MAXIMILIANO ZULUAGA-FORERO
01:46:47
Q: What about the up-down directions?
Tyler Sizemore
02:03:52
Thank you for sharing this spectacular story with us. Do we know how the fly’s velocity is encoded in the central complex? Do we know if the fly’s traveling velocity modulate the amplitude of the d7/PFN sinusoids?
Kate Otter [she/her]
02:04:06
Given the visual ring inputs to the ellipsoid body, this circuit and these computations seem specific to visual navigation, in the case of a fly born blind do you think this circuit could be co-opted by another sensory system? Would you predict that a similar architecture would exist to do these computations for other navigational systems (auditory/olfactory, etc.)?
Andrew Straw
02:04:58
Do flies have a 45 degree quantization of the world?
Gina Mason
02:06:14
Great developmental question Kate
Shivam Chitnis
02:06:40
Wonderful talk! Certain insects perform path integration in the dark. Since the visual motion signal enters the system through the PFNs would you expect the travelling direction signal to persist in these insects? Or would you expect them to get a signal from a different modality (wind direction maybe?)
Kathrin Kajderowicz
02:07:07
Thank you, wonderful talk. Question: Apologies if I missed this, but how old were the flies used in the experiments and when does the ellipsoid body and protocerebral bridge finishing developing?
Raphael Cohn
02:07:40
@kate I believe it can also track wind direction, from another set of wind direction ring neurons
Francesca Walsh
02:08:25
Besides velocity, were there any other types of information you expected to be represented in this circuit that did not appear?
Jessica Maltman
02:09:01
How do you believe these findings correspond to human navigation? What do you think the major similarities/differences would be?
Tyler Sizemore
02:12:03
There are many times when different streams of sensory information will hold more/less weight for determining how that animal properly navigates its environment (i.e. cloudy day vs. bright blue skies). In this case then, the animal’s compass would likely use wind direction (for the sake of argument), or another sensory cue, so the animal’s ability to properly traverse its environment and achieve its goal remains intact. Assuming, neurons from different sense modalities are integrated before/within the compass, and the fly can achieve similar behavioral goals/outcomes, do we know if there are neurons/circuit motifs in place that could allow for this sort of “information gating” or synapse reweighing in the central complex?
Shivam Chitnis
02:15:20
In the paper with the realistic scenes that you mentioned, the offset for the compass changes for different scenes. Sorry if I missed this, but how does this play into the mathematics of the vector addition?
Hannah Deane
02:15:30
Thank you!
Ani Maroyan
02:15:50
Thank you for the great talk!!
Gina Mason
02:15:53
Thank you!
Tyler Sizemore
02:15:58
gotta meet with my PI, but thanks again larry
Catherine McEachern
02:16:00
Thank you so much!
Shivam Chitnis
02:16:01
Thank you!