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UMass Theory Seminar (CS 891M) - Shared screen with speaker view
John Pomerat
23:52
So sigma sort of a homomorphism?
John Pomerat
24:05
is*
Calder Oakes Morton-Ferguson
24:17
Sigma obfuscates/encodes information - it is not a map between two groups
John Pomerat
24:46
Okay, I see, thank you
Calder Oakes Morton-Ferguson
31:12
Shoup’s original notation here was A(\sigma; 1, x) = x (EXTREMELY confusing, since A only gets the information of \sigma(1), \sigma(x))
Calder Oakes Morton-Ferguson
33:54
Only \sigma is probabilistic here, so O(.) makes sense in the usual way “in the variable m”
Cameron Musco
01:04:43
In response to tightening the probability bounds on polynomial roots, I might have misunderstood this question but: if you are looking at univariate polynomials over Z_p then I feel like you can't get better than d/p. You have d roots. So sum_{x \in Z_p} Pr(x is a root) = d. So at best, the max probability of x being a root is d/p. Of course if you restricted your attention to polynomials with less roots the point would improve.
Cameron Musco
01:05:15
bound* would improve
Calder Oakes Morton-Ferguson
01:07:09
Thanks for the great talk Nikki! The “Oracle” in this talk is particularly relevant terminology, what with the recent TikTok-Oracle deal in the news lately :P
John Pomerat
01:07:21
Thank you!
Rik Sengupta
01:07:22
thanks Nikki!
Rajarshi Bhattacharjee
01:07:30
thanks Nikki!